"So Many Roads" and "Best of the West"

"So Many Roads" was released by Brooklyn Jazz Underground Records in April, 2014.  The album has received great reviews world wide, and is on three 'Best of 2014' list:

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VillageVoiceBestofImage

BestofNYCJRlong

 

 

 

 

"Danish bassist Anne Mette Iversen is now based in Berlin, though her leading role in the Brooklyn Jazz Underground has had a huge impact on the New York scene. Her Double Life ensemble combines jazz quintet and string quartet with extraordinary results: Just behold the profusion of harmonic color and naturally flowing swing on the group's second release, So Many Roads. The album says a lot in just under 37 minutes." - David R. Adler, The Village Voice

Iversen’s long-running quartet includes saxophonist John Ellis and pianist Danny Grissett, who both play wonderfully burnished improvisations here that bounce off Iversen’s fertile material ... The only real problem with So Many Roads is that the journey ends before you want it to.”             - Bradley Bambarger, DownBeat Magazine

“[a] highly rewarding road trip through Anne Mette Iversen’s fertile mind” -  Jeff Tamarkin, JazzTimes  

This is a great piece of music ... it’s like two groups performing simultaneously, and periodically bleeding into each other’s worlds in fascinating and thrilling ways.”        - Phil Freeman, Burning Ambulance 

DOUBLE LIFE - on So Many Roads:

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BEST OF THE WEST:

"Best of the West" was featured on A Blog Supreme / NPR Jazz as part of the article "5 Great Works Of Modern Chamber Jazz" - alongside  amazing musicians and composers: Wayne Shorter, Brad Mehldau, Chico Hamilton and Dave Douglas.

The movement "West (Menuet)" was selected Song of the Day on NPR Music, in May 2008: 

"Few other arrangers can deter schmaltz when putting strings to swing. And even fewer possess her sense for dulcet harmonies and exquisitely developed form — the patient listener is rewarded with a probing, big-R Romantic, strings-only cadenza at the end. Rarer still is the mind that could put it all together in a way that proclaims itself as the work of an improvising musician. Beauty may be hard to find in jazz, but as Iversen proves, that doesn't mean it's dormant in familiar elements, waiting to be expressed."                                                                                 - Patrick Jarenwattananon, NPR Music

DOUBLE LIFE - the Best of the West team:

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